Cowboys and Cardinals lock arms in anthem protests

"That's not the place to do anything other than honor the flag and everybody that's given up a little for it," he said.

'Most reputable men I've ever met'

Cowboys players, in their public statements, have largely trod the middle ground on the issue, while at least two Cardinals declined to rule out the possibility of protesting.

Arians has said he concurs with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who called Trump's remarks divisive and said they demonstrate "an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL" and its players.

"I've been in locker rooms for 25 years, and some of the most reputable men I've ever met wear that uniform," Arians said. "To even overcome the things in their life to get to the NFL is amazing. What they've done in the last month for hurricane relief victims speaks volumes of what we're all about in the NFL."

Offensive lineman D.J. Humphries was less diplomatic, declining to call Trump by his name.

"You can't talk to that person," he said. "You're talking to a wall. You may as well talk to my locker because you're going to get the same response ... I hate that this happened. I'm just trying to figure a way that I can help my people, and help the people on this side of the spectrum understand right and wrong."

Humphries echoed the words of defensive end Frostee Rucker, who said now is the time to come together and "show compassion, love and everything else we do."

"It's a brotherhood in the locker room. We're out in the community, and we know ourselves. We know everything we're about. We can't let one single person, even though it's the President, dictate how we feel. We stick together. We're in a union. If someone takes a knee, it's almost like we all take a knee."

Trump: Players should not 'disrespect' flag

The latest chapter in the controversy came Friday night when Trump told those attending a political rally in Alabama that NFL owners should fire any "son of a bitch" who stages a protest during the National Anthem.

The President's focus remained on sports Saturday morning, as he tweeted he was rescinding a White House invitation for the NBA champion Golden State Warriors because two-time league MVP Steph Curry was "hesitating" in accepting the presidential offer. (Curry actually had flat-out declined the invitation.)

Hours later, the President went back in on athletes following in the knee prints of Kaepernick, who has said he refuses to stand during the anthem because he cannot "show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color."

Read Trump's two-part tweet: "If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, or other leagues, he or she should not be allowed to disrespect our Great American Flag (or Country) and should stand for the National Anthem. If not, YOU'RE FIRED. Find something else to do!"

Trump went on to make the protests his cause du jour -- or more accurately, de deux jours -- as 15 of his next 23 tweets over the weekend addressed the demonstrations.